In the Center for Conservation Innovation at Defenders of Wildlife, we work at the intersection of science, technology, and policy to find creative, practical solutions for better conservation.

Science

We lead and collaborate on original research into the realities of how conservation laws and policies are implemented.

Technology

We develop and deploy new technologies to collect and communicate actionable conservation data.

Policy

We think creatively about how science, technology, and policy are developed together and advocate for tightly integrated solutions.

Events

Convening Conservation

The Partnership for Action in Conservation Technology (PACT) is a day-long workshop for leaders in conservation and technology to …

As we move out of the information age and into the attention age, conservation organizations need new tools to tell their story, stand …

There is limited publicly available information on the ranges of too many species listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA), …

Blog Posts

The ESA is often considered one of the strongest laws in the world for wildlife conservation, in part because of the prohibition …

It’s no secret that the Trump administration is attacking science. One environmental attack is particularly appalling, but …

A key element of creating informed and reliable maps of species distributions is using data from publicly available community science …

Out on a mountainside in Hawaii are a bunch of snails we’re concerned about. Some we’re concerned about because their …

We’re kicking off the CCI Seminar Series with a talk on brand-new–not even published (but soon to be)–science of …

Themes Across Our Work



Planning

Planning is the first step in effective and efficient conservation: we need to know the goal and what science says is needed to get there.

Implementation

After the planning stage, we set to work carrying out necessary actions to make conservation work. That may be as broad as implementing the Endangered Species Act (ESA) or as focused as building a fence to keep cattle from trampling habitat for Chiricahua leopard frogs.

Monitoring

Monitoring is essential to effective and efficient conservation: we need to know the effects of our actions on wildlife, from the benefits of actions to recover species to the consequences of authorizing harm.